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Wednesday, October 30, 2019

#meettheartist
Meet Neville Barbour

"I want people to appreciate the syncretic nature of humanity."






Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.
 I grew up in two separate worlds. Feeling accepted and rejected by both, I wouldn’t change the experience for the world. 

Art has been the only steadfast thing that I’ve held onto throughout my life. In some ways, my commitment to art has taught me how to commit to others. 

I studied at the Academy of Art in San Francisco. 

What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?

I want people to appreciate the syncretic nature of humanity. 

 What influences your work? Why?

History and religion influences a lot of my work. I’m very interested in what “different” people do under similar circumstances. I think there’s more commonality than people would like to admit.

What does it mean to you to participate in Hera an exhibiting artist for the In God We Trust exhibition?

Religion is one of those things that can be essential to a person’s wellbeing yet is often not talked about it. In some ways, it seems that we hide our faith in fear that people will judge our irrational thoughts. After all, religion is one of the few perspectives that can’t be proven. And in a lot of ways, it relies on our blind faith to stay relevant. 

Honestly, I’m just flattered to share my perspective. 




Tuesday, October 29, 2019


#meettheartist
Meet C.B. Murphy

"I am interested in mystery. I don’t like propaganda."


Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.


I’ve always been creative as far back as I remember. At first I thought I wanted to make films, but then gave that up.  I didn’t get serious about painting though until later in my life. Once I started it has only grown in my passion for it. I also write fiction and it seems to support my painting, going back and forth from words to images.


What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?

I am interested in mystery. I don’t like propaganda. I like to make things that that have many interpretations, even if they are opposites. I think encountering art that is confusing is a positive thing. I do like using representational imagery in ways inspired by circus posters and outsider art generally. I do also like the experiences of delight and awe. I don’t shy away from “dark” imagery as I think it is useful to be reminded we are mortal.

What influences your work? Why?

From the classical art world I would say Surrealism—artists like Magritte and de Chirico. There is a category people use now called “popsurrealism” or “low brow” that takes its inspiration from movie posters, comics, advertisements, signage, street art, movies, anime, etc. I feel like this is the category I belong in if one needs a category. 

What does it mean to you to participate in Hera an exhibiting artist for the In God We Trust exhibition?

I think it’s a good thing to wonder about the universe and how it works. Lots of people have ideas about this, but in the end we know very little. 


Monday, October 28, 2019

#MeettheArtist
Meet Jenny E. Balisle

"Fascinated by alternative realities, disorientation, and flight, I combine disparate experiences to create new narratives, perspectives, and theories. "





1. Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.

My education consists of a B.A. in Art and Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and a M.F.A. from the Academy of Art College in San Francisco.  Selected exhibition highlights include the de Young Museum Artist-in-Residence, Orange County Center for Contemporary Art, Chicago Cultural Center, Korean Cultural Center, Harvard University, Farmington Museum, Museu Brasileiro Sao Paulo, and Shanghai Oil Painting & Sculpture Institute Art Museum.

Have been fortunate to have my artworks featured in The Huffington PostWOMENCINEMAKERSA5 MagazineZYZZYVAThe Drum Literary Magazine, and Sculptural Pursuits Magazine.  Public art experience consists of The Cube Art Project, Hearts in San Francisco, and South San Francisco Utility Box Mural Project.

Currently, I work as an artist, curator, advocate, writer, lecturer, and instructor at the Academy of Art University and UC Berkeley Extension.  Advocacy is an important part of my life and practice.  As a result, I serve as Chair on the Richmond Arts & Culture Commission and as a Public Art Advisory Committee member.


2. What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?

When creating art, the focus is how to best implement a concept.  Viewers have diverse backgrounds and to predict reactions can be a challenge.  The goal is share a researched perspective that explores a version of truth.  The art is a tool for communication by facilitating conversation and fostering awareness.  


3. What influences your work? Why?

My art practice investigates diverse, interdependent, and symbiotic relationships within natural and manmade environments.  Fascinated by alternative realities, disorientation, and flight, I combine disparate experiences to create new narratives, perspectives, and theories.  The goal is to identify how patterns and symbols of influence impact perception, social behavior, institutions, history, and truth.

Mediums are repurposed by altering function to explore identity, ideology, and inequality.  As a multidisciplinary artist, my practice incorporates drawings, sculpture, site-specific installations, objects, digital, video, and audio.  Inspiration, investigation, research, writing, and discovery dictate the final form. 


4. What does it mean to you to participate in Hera an exhibiting artist for the In God We Trust exhibition?

Equality in the art world circumvents reality.  In a recent The New York Times article titled Female Artists Made Little Progress in Museums Since 2008, Survey Finds, the byline is clear: “In the past decade, only 11 percent of all work acquired by the countrys top museums was by women.  Artists must support and participate in venues that encourage diversity and critical thinking!

In God We Trust: Reflections on Religion in America explores how faith permeates our culture.  The exhibition becomes a vigorous investigation beyond aesthetics.  My artwork DOES YOUR GOD APPROVE? serves as a historical marker to how the perversion of religion justifies abhorrent behavior and policy today.  Its an honor to exhibit at HERA gallery whose legacy is rooted in education and advocacy.  

Links:






To see more of Jenny's work visit her website: http://jennyebalisle.com

Thursday, October 24, 2019

#Meettheartist
Meet Armando Zirakzadeh
"When people view my work, I want to reveal myself to them.  First, I want them to begin to understand me, and then I hope they can find a relationship between their lives and mine."

  
Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.

 My name is Armando Zirakzadeh.  I was born in Tehran, Iran in 1955 to an Iranian father and a Guatemalan mother. My family moved to Boulder, Colorado when I was 6 months old; I became a citizen at the age of 9. I have been married since 1979 and have two children.

I studied art at Colorado State University, where I received my BFA in printmaking in 1981.  In 1984 I started Master Screen Art Silkscreening, which I ran until 1990, when I switched to teaching art for a career.  I taught art from 1990-2012 in the Boulder Valley School District, and began at Bird Studios printmaking upon my retirement.   I have exhibited in shows both locally, nationally and internationally since 2012, and was part of the Artnauts Global Artist’s Collective from 2012-2019.
I am excited to have opportunities to continue to work on and develop my printmaking skills both now and in the future.

What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?

 When people view my work, I want to reveal myself to them.  First, I want them to begin to understand me, and then I hope they can find a relationship between their lives and mine.
This contact between the artist and audience is paramount to the artistic process.  If one person questions their experiences or beliefs, or is enlightened in any way, my work has been worthwhile.

What influences your work? Why?
I am influenced by the world around me and sharing my personal view of the world with my audience.  As a printmaker I start with black and white, and soon begin developing ways of combining multiple printmaking techniques to expand my palette. Presently I am using intaglio techniques on layered paper to create textures and colors.  The exploration of printmaking techniques excites me and keeps my work fresh.

What does it mean to you to participate in Hera an exhibiting artist for the In God We Trust exhibition?
The “In God We Trust” exhibition allows me to examine my personal spirituality.  The subject matter requires honesty because you can not lie to yourself or to God.  The relationship between my Gid and myself is extremely important to my life.  I was raised as a Catholic, my father was a Muslim, and my wife is a Protestant pastor’s daughter.  This allowed me to explore the relationships of multiple religions in America.





To view more of Armando's work visit his website http://fatbirdstudios.net/index.html

Wednesday, October 23, 2019


#Meettheartist
Meet Sharon Guglielmo



My Interest in art and creative expression began during my childhood in such a
way that I was sharing my talent as early as age 11 by teaching arts and crafts to
youngsters at a community center in Providence and, by age 16, placed on their
payroll. This helped pay for my education along with a part time job at a supermarket
at RIC, where I earned a BA and MAT in Mathematics with a minor in Art. The degree
choice was from the influence of my superb high school math teacher of 3 years.
I had the best of both worlds because my interest in interdisciplinary learning
allowed me to incorporate art and other relevant subjects for my classes to
understand the purpose of the mathematical concepts. This would culminate with an
interdisciplinary math fair each year by the students. And after attaining my MAT
degree, I was able to devote my free time to continuing education in Art at RISD.

My intention for my watercolor paintings is to have a purpose beyond the
beauty it may portray. History, conservation, the environment and many other
causes are all part of my artistic visions.

Acceptance into the show, In God We Trust, reinforces the relevance of my
painting of Mohammed AL Samawi to religion especially its positive and negative
impact on the world that makes it not only pleasurable to me but more meaningful for
the viewer as well!




Monday, October 21, 2019


#MeettheArtist
Meet Carole P. Kunstadt

"Transformation, contemplation and gratitude are my essential inspirations in Sacred Poem Series. I am exploring idea/intent as well as the materials in my work. I am striving to extract simplicity from complexity. "



Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.


Born in Boston, with a childhood in Sharon MA, i had after-school art lessons with the town art teacher who lived in an intriguing Revolutionary era house just up the road.  She encouraged each individual's unique eye and the freedom to explore early in my development. I received a BFA, from Hartford Art School, Hartford, CT and continued with postgraduate studies at the Akademie der Bildenen K√ľnste, Munich, Germany.  Six years ago  I re-entered a familiar landscape as in my youth, moving to the Hudson Valley, having lived for 35 years in NYC.

What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?

My devotion to books is inspired by the ability of the written word to take the reader to other places through stories, poems, and prayers. Through the exploration and manipulation of the materials the process reveals how language can become visual through re-interpretation. A long held thought that influences my works on/of paper is: Evidence in the tactile provides contrast of the ethereal.  How do I as an artist present the spiritual and unutterable concepts while in this physical plane. My work is intimate in scale and sentiment, requiring the viewer to be sensitive and contemplative. I like the notion of one having to slow down in order to fully appreciate the work. The subtleties and the detail draws the eye close. Transformation, contemplation and gratitude are my essential inspirations in Sacred Poem Series. I am exploring idea/intent as well as the materials in my work. I am striving to extract simplicity from complexity. 

What influences your work? Why?

The Sacred Poems series, is an exploration generated by the materials: two editions of an antique Parish Psalmody, dated 1844 and 1849. As an art student and in my first years as a freelance artist I was a calligrapher, and have always been fascinated by language, text and illuminations. I purchased the first volume in 2000 from a used-book seller in Vermont without any specific idea in mind. In 2006 I used the paper as the ground for a collage. But to my surprise I was enticed and captivated by the responsiveness of the paper: the inherently facile, tactile, tender yet pliable pages. Soon I was transforming them in unexpected ways -  layering pages with the lines of text sewn through; weaving strips cut from the pages, fascinated by the random patterns created by the letters and gilding them. It had been over 25 years since I had been involved in tapestry weaving. The process was truly satisfying: to find previous skills resurfacing unexpectedly and from a different orientation. I also discovered that the book is a container storing the history and energies it has absorbed over time. The casual purchase of a book ultimately changed my creative path. The series has grown to over 100 unique works evoking an ecumenical offering: poems of praise and gratitude.
What does it mean to you to participate in Hera an exhibiting artist for the In God We Trust
exhibition?
I am interested in sanctity and the metaphysical not only in this series but also in other recent work.which reorders and redefines materials in order to get to their very essence. 
I welcome and appreciate the focus on the spiritual and the metaphysical quality of contemplation and timelessness.  In God We Trust offers a counterpoint to the mundane and the chaotic.
In 2002 I exhibited in Hera Gallery's The Mark with three works from my Markings Series early on in its inception, and which I am continuing to explore currently.
It was an exciting presentation of intriguing works which encouraged me to focus on mark making.  

 Sacred Poem LXVII, gold leaf, thread, paper: Parish Psalmody dated 1849, 9 x 9 x .5 in, 504 knots, 2011



 Sacred Poem LXXXIX, gold leaf, interfacing, paper: Parish Psalmody dated 1849, 5 x 6.5 x 2.5 in, 2014





 Sacred Poem CII, gold leaf, linen thread, paper: Parish Psalmody dated 1849, 4 x 4 x 4 in, 2016

To see more of Carole's work, visit her website:  http://carolekunstadt.com/portfolio.php


#MeettheArtist
Meet Kim Triedman






Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.

I was a writer (published poet and novelist) before I became involved in visual art. My earliest memories of being artistic are of writing poetry. My art, like my writing, has a strong narrative bent. I began working in collage and mixed media as a way to further indulge my fascination with story.
I have no formal training, but I have always been a maker.  I found myself moving into visual art gradually over the past five years or so  I have always loved putting odd things together to come up with something entirely different.  It feels very much like writing a poem to me – allowing your subconscious to make connections and following them down a serpentine path.  Both my mother and my daughter are trained artists, and both have inspired me greatly over the years.      
I have always loved old things, and I create most of my artworks out of found and recycled objects.  Many of my mixed media pieces make use of old, wooden window sashes, which serve as frame and template but also conceptual springboard.  For me they offer a particularly rich and exploitable template: like sudden and unexpected purviews, they open us to juxtapositions in search of a narrative thread.  They make of us voyeurs, unwitting or not, of both the world around us and, ultimately, of ourselves.   
Collage is at the heart of most of my work.  My imagination tilts to the odd and visually arresting detail.  Compositions are drawn from places I have known, sometimes through memory but mostly from my own photography.  My palette is often muted, though - like life - shot through with small urgencies of color."    

What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work? 

It seems to me that the artist provides a kind of prism to the world — a unique way of looking at what is already there, whether it be an internal truth or an external reality.  I would hope that my work offers some of that, and that it challenges the viewer to consider what emerges when disparate things are put together in new and provocative ways.

What influences your work? Why? 

As I’ve mentioned, my work has a strong narrative element. It has also been referred to as “feminist,” although that is not by design or deliberation. I generally don’t have a clue what each piece will be or why or what it means until I finish it. It’s an exceedingly organic experience. I use a combination of my own photography, vintage photographs, fine handmade papers, and random found objects in my work.  For inspiration I tend to sit with images and others materials surrounding me until one thing begins to “speak” with another.  Once I find that spark of conversation, I’m off.

What does it mean to you to participate in Hera an exhibiting artist for the In God We Trust exhibition?
  
I recently went to see Todd Bartel and Jack Masse’s amazing collage exhibit at Hera.  Though I’ve known about the gallery for a few years, it was my first time actually visiting the space.  I was thoroughly impressed.  It was an extremely good exhibition -- well displayed, and well promoted – and I am extremely happy to be included in this upcoming show.  This piece seemed ready-made for the theme: it floats iconical Garden of Eden imagery in a soup of contemporary cynicism. 






To see more of Kim's work visit her website: http://www.kimtriedman.com/

Friday, October 18, 2019

#Meettheartist
Meet Deane Valentine Bowers

"I am passionate about being an Environmentally Responsible Artist and I make it my mission to create EcoFriendly Art"
Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.

 Originally from Richmond, Virginia, I relocated to the Lowcountry almost 10 years ago and now call Charleston home. Inspiration is always found in the beauty and simplicity of the South Carolina Coast. For this reason, I am passionate about being an Environmentally Responsible Artist and I make it my mission to create EcoFriendly Art. While my eclectic collection includes pieces in Mixed Media Collage, Clay and Paint, my work in Found Object Assemblage is what brings me the greatest joy and satisfaction. 

As a self-taught artist, my creative process is guided by two principles. First and most importantly, produce art that makes people happy. Second, strive to be an Environmentally Conscious Artist whose work has a positive impact on the Environment and celebrates recycling and repurposing as an Art form. Using mostly discarded, abandoned and reclaimed materials, my "Environmental Folk Art" honors those forgotten things. That shattered, busted and cracked piece of metal or wood lying in the streets or on the beach is the focal point of my Found Object Sculptures. There is an abundance of items thrown away, left behind and forgotten on a daily basis that are free, plentiful and readily available. Every nail, screw, bottle cap, piece of wood, wire or metal has its own story as it has gone through some journey to end up discarded. Each item was useless on its own. The twisted nails, metal scraps and old bottle caps display an individual weak roughness, but when paired with other fragmented pieces, they convey strength. Their interaction with one another is accomplished through detailed layering in a graphic and interesting medley highlighted with bold, vibrant colors to create an unusual balance of Industry and Art.  When damaged, disconnected and incomplete things come together in an unexpected and imaginative way, a distinct plainness becomes a raw form of beauty. 

What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?

There is a message of Hope, Fresh Starts, New Beginnings and Second Chances woven into every piece of my Art. By giving ordinary objects creative value, I am bringing out the best in these things and celebrating their flaws and imperfections as their greatest features. The rusted, street worn items used are a constant reminder that even the most damaged and irregular things have value. By discovering the goodness and the rich potential in that broken piece of wood, wire or metal, I hope that my Art will encourage others to embrace and celebrate their own shortcomings and challenges and see them as beautiful, unique characteristics that make them who they are. 







 To see more of Deane's work visit her website: http://www.DeaneVBowersArt.com

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

#MeettheartistsofInGodWeTrust

Meet Tyrus Clutter
"My desire is to have the interaction of text and image work on a viewer even after an initial viewing."



Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.
I started taking art courses while in high school, and although I was an excellent overall student, I soon realized that creating art was my passion. I went on to study art in college (BA from Spring Arbor University) and then grad school (MFA in painting from Bowling Green State University). I started working as a gallery assistant at BGSU at the same time that I was taking my first printmaking courses. I was tasked with creating a database of the BGSU art collection which is mostly prints. I was soon hooked on the processes of printmaking and have spilt my work between painting and printmaking ever since.


What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?
Since most of my work incorporates text or is literally “drawn” with text, I expect a certain amount of viewer interaction. Viewers tend to read the discernible passages of text, but I want them to question why that text has formed that particular image. How do they interrelate? My desire is to have the interaction of text and image work on a viewer even after an initial viewing.


What influences your work? Why?
Authors often influence the texts that I choose for my work. That often influences the imagery that I use, too. I seek out certain texts, but sometimes when I am reading a book for a specific subject interest, a phrase will open up an unexpected concept that fuels a new series.


What does it mean to you to participate in Hera, either as an artist member OR as an exhibiting artist?
I appreciate the breadth of work that Hera is willing to explore. When I go to a gallery over and over I like to be challenged by something that I did not expect to find. It is in those moments of discovery that viewers can have some of the most meaningful interactions with art.

"Great Soul"

"Emancipator"

Il Cenacolo

You can learn more about Tyrus's work: www.tyrusclutter.comhttp://tyrusclutter.blogspot.com
#MeettheartistsofInGodWeTrust

Meet Hannah Altman



Artist Statement
Jewish folklore suggests that the memory of an action is as primary as the action itself. This is to say that when my hand is wounded, I remember other hands. I trace ache back to other aches - when my mother grabbed my wrist too hard pulling me across the intersection, when my grandmother’s fingers went numb on the ship headed towards America fleeing the Nazis, when Miriam’s palms enduringly poured water for the Hebrews throughout their biblical desert journey - this is how the Jew is able to fathom an ache. Treating photographs in this body of work as stories with individual bloodlines of their own, I explore notions of Jewish memory, narrative heirlooms, and interpretive image making. To encounter an image is not to ask what it feels like, but to ask: what does it remember like?

Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.
I’m from New Jersey, and completed my BFA in photography at Point Park University in
Pittsburgh. I am now an MFA candidate in photography at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, where I’ll be graduating this Spring. I make art to further modes of conversation; I am particularly in love with photography’s ability to function as visual literature.

What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?
I like to think that my work has layers of understanding. Though it very much revolves around Jewish ideology, there are universal feelings expressed that can place the viewer, the artist, and the subject matter under the same umbrella of empathy.

What influences your work? Why?
I love fiction short stories and think a lot of my work materializes in the same way - complicated,incomplete, poetic - with the ability to both stand on its own and exist as part of a larger whole.

What does it mean to you to participate in Hera an exhibiting artist for the In God We Trust
exhibition?
I think it’s really important to engage religious work in a feminist space as we grapple with the large issue of how these two intersecting points exist in relation to each other. Hosting a show about religion at one of the oldest women founded spaces in the country is really exciting for that reason; it provides a physical space for these complex problems to be considered.








To learn more about Hannah and her work visit, https://www.hannahaltmanphoto.com/#1

Sunday, October 13, 2019

#MeettheArtist
Meet Brooke T Waldron
Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.
 We originate from our personal stories of who we are as people, our own life realities that shape us into the individuals we become. I am a native woman and citizen of the Seaconke Wampanoag Tribe. I am employed with the Division of Indian and Native American Programs under the Department of Labor, and a third generation advocate for Native people. I am also part Scottish and a lifelong equestrian. My values and experiences are the common thread that is generally noticeable in my work. I am not a professional artist under the term that I make a living creating art. However, I am a devoted artist under the conditions that my art and my career intersect frequently.  To embrace the creative process for expression and provide emphasis to your life is what I think compels most people to define themselves as artists. 

What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?
  It is entirely possible that most people will walk away with nothing. Or what experience they have, is based loosely on their own objective opinions on the subject matter. I would rather they view my work with curiosity to expand their knowledge and take initiative to embrace more empathy towards people of different conditions. 


What influences your work? Why?
 I am influenced and emotionally charged by cultural appropriation. I balance that with my love for history, nature and animals. I have long felt that wildlife is the best reflection of goodness and animals unaltered by humans, are the greatest teachers. I grew up with very strong parents and raised on a 118 acre farm. It is a lifestyle that sculpts every character trait imaginable and often effected my ability to identify with my peers. It is with these personal experiences and cultural traditions that I was able to view circumstances from the outside looking in. I challenge others to stand outside their comfort zone and approach circumstances with the widest perspective as possible. 


What does it mean to you to participate in Hera as an exhibiting artist for the In God We Trust exhibition?
 This call to artist was an opportunity that specifically resonated with me and most aspects of my work. As a native Rhode Islander I had visited Hera as high school student and was introduced to galleries by my friend/art teacher at the time Elizabeth Lind. I had also begun to understand the breadth of artistic expression and took interest in following artists that inspired me. Hera, was the first gallery I visited as a teenager and to be chosen as an exhibiting artist aligns with my full circle transition into gallery exhibitions. 




#Meettheartists

Meet Michelle Vezina Peterlin
"I make art because it is a vital to me as breathing."

Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.

I was born and raised in Gardner, Massachusetts.  I have wanted to be an artist since as long as I can remember.  I was noticed and placed in accelerated art programs from elementary school through high school.   There are about 8 other artists in my family.  I have been a freelance artist for over 25 years.

I have a degree in Studio Art from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

I make art because it is a vital to me as breathing.  I am always exploring color, forms and shape.  I am curious by nature and I capture images, ideas and memories within my paintings.

What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?

My paintings, whether they are botanical, still life or portraits,  are made to emerge the viewer into the scene they are viewing.  I strive to create an allegorical scene where the viewer can create their own narrative.

What influences your work? Why?

I am influence by many things, mainly color and form.  In my portraits, both of these elements come together.  In my portraits, I strive to capture an intimate moment and show something that captures the essence of the subject and make it something that the viewer can related to.  I want to celebrate the gift of life whether its ordinary or exceptional.

What does it mean to you to participate in Hera an exhibiting artist for the In God We Trust exhibition?

The topic of the in God We trust exhibit is so important.  I believe in the American right of the freedom of speech and the freedom to worship.  There are so many factions trying to infringe upon these rights.  We must do everything we can to preserve because they are universal human rights and without them we have nothing.

The Garden

Rachel's Daughter

A Mess of Fish

To view more of Michelle's work, visit her website: http://www.michellevezinapeterlin.com/index.htm