Saturday, June 15, 2019

#MeetOurArtistsMonday

Meet Roberta Richman, one of the founders of Hera Gallery, Roberta's landscape inspired imagery is now on View June 15-July 20, 2019 in our current Exhibition, Something Between Us. Opening reception is June 22, 6-8pm.




Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.

I was about 13 when I first discovered how much I loved painting and drawing when I started taking classes at the local Y. I majored in art at Brooklyn College and discovered etching, spent two years at Pratt Graphic Art Center using their workshop and got my MFA in printmaking at Indiana University. At Brooklyn I got to take classes with artists supplementing their work with teaching, notably Ad Rhinehardt, Jimmy Ernst, Philip Pearlstein.

What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?

I don't think much about how others respond to my work. Making art satisfies some need I have to speak to myself more than to others. I can tell you more about what my art is not....It is not political or sentimental. I am not sending a message. For me making paintings is a visual experience of evolving color, of shape and a feeling of landscape, of the natural world but not of a particular place or time.

What influences your work? Why?

I am influenced by the world around me....the natural landscapes I find myself in when I travel but also by places I'm in frequently. I take photographs when I'm outdoors and use what I've seen even though the final work never resembles the original place. I'm also influenced by looking at the art of other people.....especially the abstract impressionists who came to fame in the 1950s and 60s. I especially love the paintings of Mark Rothko


Why are you a member of Hera?

At first, Hera was a great way to meet and collaborate with other artists and of course, to show my work without judgement of dealers or gallery owners. 
Later, when my work and career kept me from being in the studio as often as I had been, Hera allowed me to stay connected to my identity as an artist. Now, in retirement and back in the studio, although not as often as I had imagined I would be, being a Hera member gives me the opportunity to show at my own pace and the chance to meet and see the work of new younger artists who I would otherwise not get to know. Hera has been an important part of my life. I'm grateful for all its given me.



Saturday, June 8, 2019

#MeettheartistMonday

Meet Abigail Wambolt!





Abigail Wambolt is one of the artists in the upcoming exhibition, Something Between Us. The exhibition runs from June 15 through July 20 with the opening reception on Saturday June 22, 2019 from 6-8pm at Hera Gallery, 10 High Street, Wakefield, RI. For more information about the exhibition visit www.heragallery.org and if have not seen the excellent article about the show in Artscope magazine you can here: https://artscopemagazine.com/2019/05/still-empowering-heras-distinctive-summer-members-show/.

To see more of Abigails work, visit Hera or her website https://abigailwamboldt.com/home.html





Tell us your artist story, some biographical info, when did you decide to be an artist? Why do you make art? Where did you study? Etc.


I don’t come from an art family but I was very lucky to have great art teachers growing up, and even though my parents were skeptical they were always supportive. I had a very circuitous education. I went to Montserrat College of Art for a year, and then to Alfred University for a year. I felt like I had no direction, so I dropped out and worked various jobs. I lived in New Orleans for a while and took a couple classes at Tulane. I was there right after Hurricane Katrina and something about the mess and the strength of that city enchanted me. At some point I went to hairdressing school because I was tired of working gigs that weren't going anywhere. I think I made more money in my time as a hairdresser then I do as an art professor. When I look at my resume it feels like such a joke. We only include the glamorous things. No one includes farm laborer, figure model or kitchen staff when they are applying for positions in the art world. Yet so many artists pay their bills doing something other than making art. I think all of that life experience contributes just as much to the work as formal education.
When I was first at Montserrat I had a professor named Timothy Harney. He is one of a kind and his dedication to his students is unmatched. I decided I had to study with him more and returned to Montserrat to do so. I went on to complete a Masters in Painting at the University of New Hampshire. In graduate school I had the opportunity to teach Drawing I, and it felt natural to me. By the time I finished my MFA I knew I wanted to keep teaching. Currently I am an Adjunct Professor of Studio Art at several different colleges.
For me being an artist wasn’t really a choice. Even when I forayed into other professions I always made things. I make art because it is the only thing I can always do even when I want to jump off a bridge, it's extremely cathartic and very liberating. Everyday life requires us to follow so many rules and to function within socially acceptable behavior. In art you can say or do almost anything. If you do it well, and you believe in what your doing, you can usually get away with it. Art sometimes feels like an addiction to me, and I will use any part of myself or my life to get the sensation I want. When I manage to execute the form and content of a piece in a way that seems right it’s the best feeling in the world.


What do you want people to walk away with after experiencing your work?


I want people to walk away from my work and feel something. I don’t care if they weep, or laugh, or scream, or feel uncomfortable, I just want emotion evoked in the viewer. I want the viewer to go home and make love to their wife or quit their 9-5 or scream at the top of their lungs. We belittle reaction so much in our culture, and I think it has value. Feeling and reaction

remind us we are alive. The purpose of art to me is to help us see into a part of ourselves that is sleeping. I hope to help people find that beast inside that has been dormant and wake it up.

What influences your work? Why?


So much influences my work, books, music, art, the political or social climate, stories people share with me, or the state of constant endurance that is human existence. Sometimes I read a story in the newspaper and think “That is just so messed up, I want to say something about that”. Other times I draw on deep personal pain and the work feels born out of emotion.
Lately I have been listening to a lot of Hole. I adore Courtney Love’s rage. I am also reading a book called Trauma and Recovery by Judith Lewis Hermanand before that I was reading a banned BDSM novel, The Story of O. What I am reading will often become a part of the narrative of a work. Sometimes I will be influenced by the beat or lyrics of a song. Music will create images and nonlinear stories in my mind and they often come out in the painting.
Once I get these images onto the canvas I have to figure out how to organize the pile of thoughts to make sense for the viewer.

Why are you a member of Hera?


Women centered spaces don’t really exist anymore. Women’s bookstores and bars have vanished. While Hera Gallery is no longer just a women's space it was founded by women and is still primarily draws female members.
The art world is really misogynistic and run by straight, white men. I have no interest in being part of an institution that will probably fetishize my work, and isn’t going to understand or value my viewpoint. I seek out spaces and organizations that are going to reflect, or at least engage, my visual interests. I like seeing the strong and capable female leaders of Hera, and I enjoy being surrounded by other creative women. It is important that we preserve matriarchal spaces like Hera, so that women have the opportunity to engage in dialogue without male influence.





#MeetTheArtistsMondays

Hello! We haven't been using our blog for some time and we have decided to revive it so that we have a place to archive and share a new project, #MeetTheArtistsMondays. On Mondays, beginning Monday June 10 we will be publishing brief but informative artist interviews with Hera artists and artists who are exhibiting at Hera. There will be shared on social media and this blog will serve as an archive of artists who are in some way part of Hera Gallery. We hope you enjoy!


Friday, March 18, 2016

"Stories in Stone" Film Screening

Stories in Stone
Film Screening with Marc Levitt
Tuesday, March 29th, 7pm



Stories in Stones is the first film that looks at the Narragansett wall building tradition from multiple perspectives, artistic, spiritual, multi-generational and as a story of tribal affirmation. While some would see wall building as the haphazard placement of rocks, Stories in Stone, demonstrates that the wall’s beauty is the result of a finely honed and ever evolving sculptural aesthetic. While some see the walls as ‘the only option’ for the Narragansett, Stories in Stones makes clear, that more often than not, becoming a mason is a choice, a choice that allows freedom of movement, freedom from ‘inside’ work, freedom from working for others and the freedom to join a long and illustrious line of ancestors. While many believe that ‘tradition’ among New England Tribes is long gone, Stories in Stone makes clear that wall building remains a means to assert and perpetuate Tribal identity; in the choice to be a mason, in the placement of symbols, in the use of a particular aesthetic, in the visceral relationship to stone and in one’s spiritual connection to nature. Stories in Stone elucidates the stories that lie beneath one’s initial appreciation for the stone walls of Southern New England and in doing so, illustrates how the seemingly ordinary, can be indeed be, quite extraordinary.

Marc Levitt is a writer, storyteller, educator, radio and TV host, filmmaker and audio artist living in Wakefield, RI and NYC. He has won awards for his story recordings, for work in his unique musical/narrative historical storytelling style, for his work in radio and for his work in the arts and in the humanities.

Thursday, February 25, 2016

"Tradition & Innovation: Artists of the Eastern Woodland Tribes"


Hera Gallery & The Tomaquag Museum Present:
Tradition & Innovation
Artists of the Eastern Woodland Tribes
March 5th – April 2
Opening Reception: Saturday, March 5th, 6-8pm
Indigenous Culture Workshop: Saturday, March 12th, 1pm
Stories in Stone Film Screening: Tuesday, March 29th, 7pm


Hera Gallery is pleased host the Tradition & Innovation: Artists of the Eastern Woodland Tribes. Through this collaborative venture, Hera Gallery and the Tomaquag Museum seek to promote a dialogue about Native American arts & culture and its role in the contemporary arts. We invite the public to join us Saturday, March 5th from 6 to 8pm for the opening reception of Tradition & innovation.
 
This exhibition will present work that represents traditional approaches to Native American arts, specifically those from the Eastern Woodland tribes, as well as contemporary approaches and media. Participating artists are:

Monica Alexander, Metis/Mi’kmaq, East Otis, MA
Sharon Alexander, Narragansett, North Kingstown, RI
Rhonda Besaw, Canadian Metis/Abenaki, Whitefield, NH
Jon Campbell, Penobscot, Narragansett, RI
Jeremy Dennis, Shinnecock, University Park, PA
Graham Gruner, Narragansett, Mystic, CT
Nancy Oakley, Wampanoag/Mi’kmaq, Eskasoni, Nova Scotia
Ayanna Proctor, Piscataway Conoy, White Plains, MD
Angel Smith, Narragansett, Mystic, CT
Yolanda Smith, Seaconke/Wampanoag
Dawn Spears, Narragansett Choctaw, Ashaway, RI
Lorén M. Spears Narragansett/Niantic, Charlestown, RI
Robin Spears, Narragansett, Charlestown, RI
Olive Alexander Whitford, Narragansett, Exhibiting Post Mortem

Indigenous Culture Workshop
Saturday, March 12th, 1pm
Led by Lorén M. Spears, Executive Director of the Tomaquag Museum

Traditional items will be brought to share regarding Indigenous culture and the Spears will share the history, culture and the arts of Eastern Woodland people, with a focus on the Narragansett. There will be opportunities for participants to interact with the presenter through Q & A and other forms of interaction. The program will include some music and dance along with the oral history of Narragansett People.

Stories in Stone
Film Screening with Marc Levitt
Tuesday, March 29th, 7pm

Stories in Stones is the first film that looks at the Narragansett wall building tradition from multiple perspectives, artistic, spiritual, multi-generational and as a story of tribal affirmation. While some would see wall building as the haphazard placement of rocks, Stories in Stone, demonstrates that the wall’s beauty is the result of a finely honed and ever evolving sculptural aesthetic. While some see the walls as ‘the only option’ for the Narragansett, Stories in Stones makes clear, that more often than not, becoming a mason is a choice, a choice that allows freedom of movement, freedom from ‘inside’ work, freedom from working for others and the freedom to join a long and illustrious line of ancestors. While many believe that ‘tradition’ among New England Tribes is long gone, Stories in Stone makes clear that wall building remains a means to assert and perpetuate Tribal identity; in the choice to be a mason, in the placement of symbols, in the use of a particular aesthetic, in the visceral relationship to stone and in one’s spiritual connection to nature. Stories in Stone elucidates the stories that lie beneath one’s initial appreciation for the stone walls of Southern New England and in doing so, illustrates how the seemingly ordinary, can be indeed be, quite extraordinary.

Marc Levitt is a writer, storyteller, educator, radio and TV host, filmmaker and audio artist living in Wakefield, RI and NYC. He has won awards for his story recordings, for work in his unique musical/narrative historical storytelling style, for his work in radio and for his work in the arts and in the humanities.

Thursday, February 11, 2016

CALLING ALL ARTISTS!

CALLING ALL ARTISTS!
 
Hera Gallery will be hosting our 3rd Annual Branching Out Birdhouse Fundraiser on April 24th at The Farmer's Daughter. While we are seeking artist made birdhouses to auction off in benefit of the gallery, we are also EXAPANDING our selection to other GARDEN ITEMS.

This year's theme is
SPIRITS IN THE GARDEN.
 
Whether it be a bird feeder, fairy house, painted planter, kinetic sculpture, or any other artistically inclined garden accent, we will be accepting donations at Hera Gallery between April 13th and April 22nd.

Monday, January 4, 2016

GALLERY CLOSED UNTIL 2/6

The Gallery will be closed through January. 

We will reopen on 2/6 for the opening of 
The 27th Children's Art Exhibition!

Friday, December 4, 2015

Position Open: Gallery Director


Position Description

Gallery Director
The position of Gallery Director, Hera Gallery/Hera Educational Foundation is a part-time paid position (18 hours per week, $12.10/hour). The Director reports directly to the President of the Board of Directors.

This position, while an administrative position, is a creative springboard allowing a motivated individual the opportunity to contribute to the local arts community by leading a well-regarded institution. Hera encourages the gallery director to pursue his or her professional interests including associate artist membership (free) in the gallery. The gallery director may also work to develop skills in the following areas:
curatorial experience and exhibition design, graphic design, professional level arts writing, website development.

Qualifications:
• Excellent written and oral communication skills
• Excellent organizational skills
• Good computer skills—proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel, familiarity with
Photoshop, Illustrator, and square space (website template)
• Administrative experience desired
·  Fundraising and event planning experience
• The gallery director must have the ability to work with a diverse audience of local community members as well as artists, arts professionals, funders, and media. Serves as liaison with community
• Background or involvement in the visual arts
·      Knowledge of Social Media, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter
·      Mailchimp for email marketing

Responsibilities:
• Administrative: execute the general day-to-day operations of the gallery, supervise interns and volunteers, and maintain exhibition and gallery records. Facilitate communication between artist members, Board of Directors and Friends of Hera. Oversee preparation of bulk mailings.
• Public Relations: includes writing press releases, developing relationships with
journalists; assisting with writing and editing gallery publications such as website,
newsletters, fundraising materials and targeted emails to journalists, supporters, artists.
• Development: Oversees board and artist members to implement annual fundraising initiatives including but not limited to 2 fundraising events per fiscal year, works with board to implement corporate sponsorship, annual appeal and friends of Hera Campaign, and grant writing.
• Assist exhibiting artists and curators with coordination of exhibitions and programs.
• Attend and prepare Director’s report for monthly Board meetings; attend gallery events. 

For more information about Hera Gallery go to www.heragallery.org. Please send a cover letter and resume to Barbara Pagh, Hera Gallery, Box 336, Wakefield, RI 02880 by January 22, 2016    

Friday, November 13, 2015

Curious Surface & November Fall Fundraiser: Sat, 11/21, 5-8pm

Saturday, November 21st, 5-8pm
Curious Surface Opening Reception
 & November Fall Fundraiser

Join us in a night of art, food, and fun with the Hera artists of Curious Surface:
Uli Brahmst, Iris Donnelly, Viera Levitt, Megan McNaught, Barbara Owen, & MJ Yeager

Silent Auction of Crafts, Art, 
& Local Business Goods/Services: 5-7:45
Wine Surprise Gift Bags Available All Night
& The Return of the
ARTIST MADE PIE LIVE AUCTION at 7PM!

Thursday, October 15, 2015

Gene Robinson is exhibiting in The World’s Smallest Art Gallery* through November 2, 2015.



                    





Gene Robinson is a retired locksmith who worked at the University of Rhode Island for over 20 years.  Through the years of raising two daughters and now a grandfather of five, Gene always managed to pursue his passion for photography.  Gene began as a film photographer, but tried digital four years ago and was completely hooked.  








Photographing mostly the natural world, Gene has a specific interest in birds.  He attributes this to the moments in his childhood spent with his uncle who raised homing pigeons.  His passion for the natural world shines through every photograph.  He explained that his wish is for others to see the beauty in nature that he sees. He hopes that this inspires them to get out there and experience this beauty themselves, but for those who can’t, he is happy that they can experience some of it through his photographs.

If you are interested in speaking to Gene and finding out more about his work, you can contact him at visionquest21@yahoo.com.